Do Squats Increase Testosterone? These Variations Do

Do Squats Increase Testosterone? These Variations Do

There are few guys who get a thrill from getting into the squat rack…

Especially when you pass the Over 40 barrier and have to deal with unpleasant ramifications the next day…

You know… The sore back, “cricked” neck and the occasional tweak right above your tailbone…

Still, it’s common knowledge that squats are a major exercise for building major muscle…

And more importantly, it’s possible that squats can give you a high-powered dose of testosterone, too…

Which will lead to even more muscle growth…

So the question I’m going to answer today is this: Do squats increase testosterone?

Let’s find out.

Do Squats Increase Testosterone?

Here’s what we know:

One meta-analysis that tested the influence of resistance training on both boys and men, indicated that stress from heavy resistance exercise increases testosterone levels in men…

And the amount of anabolic hormones being released is based on a few factors, including the amount of muscle tissue stimulated, the amount of muscle repair needed after exercise, volume completed in each training session, and the amount of rest you take in between sets (between 30-60 seconds optimally).

So when asking the question, do squats increase testosterone, you have to measure the exercise by the factors above…

Whenever you perform squats, you involve several major and minor muscle groups – hamstrings, quadriceps, lower back, glutes, calves, and core…

And the more muscle groups involved in an exercise, the greater increase in testosterone there will be…

Next, you need to consider how much muscle repair is involved after exercise – Unlike if you were to wreck your car, the greater the amount of repair after training, the more testosterone your body will produce

This, unlike the number of muscle groups involved in the movement, depends on the intensity of the workout…

If you waltz into the gym and “dog-it” on your squats, you won’t achieve the desired testosterone-boosting result.

Next, comes volume…

To spark a top-notch testosterone-boosting workout with squats, you want to have a relatively large volume… Somewhere between 20-25 repetitions at 85-95% of your max…

But you need to be especially careful here if you’re in your 40’s or older…

That’s a heavy load…

And even though it will increase your testosterone levels, you want to make sure it doesn’t put you on the sidelines from training altogether…

Which is why I recommend that you check out this cardio program that’s proven to boost testosterone levels by 530% – a greater response than you’d get from heavy squats, without the back pain.

So here’s the deal…

Do squats increase testosterone?

Yes, they do – mostly heavy squats with plenty of volume.

So I wouldn’t recommend pushing your luck if squatting has been an issue for you in the past…

But for you guys who want to get back under the bar, here are 5 of the best squat variations to get the job done – including bodyweight variations for those of you who want to initiate at least some anabolic response (though it won’t be as effective to boost testosterone as resistance squats will be).

Barbell Back Squat (or bodyweight squat variation)

  1. Begin with the barbell supported on top of the traps. Your chest should be up and your head facing forward. Take a hip-width stance. 
  2. Descend by bending at your knees and keep from moving your hips back as much as possible. Keep your torso as upright as possible. 
  3. Continue all the way down, keeping your weight on the front of your heels. At the moment your hamstrings are parallel to the floor, reverse the motion by exploding upward, and drive the weight upward.

Barbell Front Squat

  1. To begin, first set the bar on a rack that best matches your height. Once you choose the correct height and load the bar, bring your arms up under the bar while keeping your elbows high and the upper arm slightly above parallel to the floor. Rest the bar on top of your deltoids and cross your arms while grasping the bar for total control. 
  2. Lift the bar off the rack by first pushing with your legs and at the same time straightening your torso. 
  3. Step away from the rack and position your legs using a shoulder width medium stance with your toes slightly pointed outward. Keep your head up at all times and maintain a straight back as looking down will throw you off balance. This will be your starting position. 
  4. Lower the bar by bending your knees as you maintain a straight posture with your head up. Continue down until your hamstrings are parallel to the floor. At that moment reverse the motion by exploding upward and drive the weight upward.

Dumbbell Bulgarian Split Squat (or bodyweight squat variation)

  1. Position yourself into a staggered stance with your rear foot elevated on a bench press or small box and place your front foot forward. 
  2. Hold a dumbbell in each hand, letting them hang at your sides. This will be your starting position. 
  3. Begin by descending, flexing your knee and hip to lower your body down. Maintain good posture throughout the movement. Keep your front knee in line with the foot as you perform the exercise. 
  4. At the bottom of the movement, drive through your heel to extend the knee and hip to return to the starting position.

Kettlebell Sumo Squat (or bodyweight squat variation)

  1. Use 1 or 2 hands to pick up the kettlebell, pulling it up to your chest. Hold the kettlebell at chest level with both hands, making sure to keep your arms close to your body and elbows tucked in. Your feet should be slightly wider than shoulder-width apart, with your toes pointing slightly outward. Keep your back straight and abdominals tight. This will be your starting position. 
  2. Pushing your hips back, slowly bend the knees and lower your legs until your thighs are just below parallel to the floor. 
  3. Press through the heel of the foot and push your hips through to return to the starting position.

Bodyweight Pistol Squat

  1. From a standing position, raise one foot off the floor. You should be looking directly forward, with your chest up, knees and hips slightly bent, and your back straight. This will be your starting position. 
  2. Descend into a squat by flexing your hips and knee. As you squat, extend the non-working leg forward to allow clearance for your movement. Descend slowly, paying close attention to balance and proper movement mechanics, going as far as your flexibility allows. 
  3. Hold the bottom position briefly and then return to the start by extending through the hips and knee, driving through the heel of your working foot.

Now What?

Squats are a great exercise to boost your testosterone levels…

However, if you want a safer and more effective way to increase your testosterone levels through exercise, I recommend checking out the Anabolic Running program here.

Again, it’s a surefire way to increase your growth hormone by 530% in a matter of seconds…

Check it out.

– Joe LoGalbo

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